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Electrophysiologic Ablation Therapies

Treatment

Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation Therapy For Atrial Fibrillation (AF)

Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation is an invasive procedure that will offers the prospect of a life-long cure and an improved quality of life.

What is Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation and what does it involve?

It involves the insertion of catheters, or fine wires, into the heart through the veins at the top of the leg. There are electrodes at the tip of the wires that detect electrical signals from different parts of the heart. The cryoballoon is placed on a catheter which is advanced into the pulmonary veins.

 

After confirming the right positioning with X-rays and via detection of intracardiac electric impulses, the balloon is being cooled down to temperatures around -50°. This severe cold destroys (ablates) the tissue and inhibits electrical signals that are responsible for triggering Atrial Fibrillation (AF).

 

Because these signals are usually located inside the pulmonary veins in the majority of patients, this technique is also called Pulmonary Vein Isolation. 

Cryoablation therapy treatment

Success rates

Patients who have been in AF for a long time may need a more extensive ablation procedure to restore normal rhythm. Success rates of Catheter Ablation for Paroxysmal AF are approximately 70-80% and often more than one procedure is required to achieve success. The success rates are reduced if you have been in atrial fibrillation for a long time. 

 

When do you need it Atrial Fibrillation (AF) Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation?

Atrial fibrillation is a very common arrhythmia, especially in the group of patients over 70 years old. Although in most cases well tolerated, some patients suffer from very fast heart beats, palpitations and often shortness of breath and weakness, a sign of the weakening heart. 

 

To preserve and to improve heart performance, to improve quality of life and to prevent events of severe heart decompensation, this procedure will be performed aiming to eliminate the development of this arrhythmia. 

 

Risks involved

The procedure is associated with a low rate of risks but some of these can be serious. 

Our ability to use imaging guidance and cutting-edge technology minimizes patient risk.  Prior to your procedure, you will discuss your individual potential risks with your doctor.

 

Conditions to let us know about

As with all procedures involving X-rays and contrast media, let your doctor know if you are currently pregnant or breast feeding and inform your doctor about possible allergies. 

 

Preparing for your procedure

You must be fasting at least 6 hours prior to the procedure.

 

Please discuss with your doctor what medications you are taking on a regular basis. Some, like blood thinning medications and diabetes medications, may need to be paused some days prior. 

 

Insurance coverage

Cryoballoon Catheter ablation is covered by most private insurance providers. We will seek authorization from your insurance company prior to your procedure.

 

Recovering from your procedure

You will not receive general anesthesia during your procedure; however, you will get  sedation to make you feel more comfortable. You will be transferred to the regular room after the intervention until you are ready for discharge. An Echocardiography and an ECG will be performed prior to discharge. Regular Holter ECG's will follow in the next months to document the success rate of the procedure. 

 

You will be given written post procedure discharge instructions that will advise you about return to normal physical activity. 

 

 

Treatment

Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy of Supraventricular Tachycardia (SVT)

Using heat rather than cold temperatures to permanently stop arrhythmias from forming.

 

Most common indications are RF for atrial flutter and AVRNT

What is Radiofrequency ablation therapy?

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In SVT ablation therapy we use the heat on the tip of radiofrequency catheters to eliminate within the upper chambers of the heart the area of electrical muscle cells causing your arrhythmia. 

 

The interventional electrophysiologist will access a vein in your groin to guide a very thin special catheters to the target area of the right or left the upper chamber of your heart.

 

The tip of the catheter will send electrical impulses and record your heart's electricity, this way we  locate the best spot where to apply the heat through electrical energy (radiofrequency ablation) which damages the tissue and causes scarring thereby eliminating or blocking the pro-arrhythmogenic property of this area that is causing your SVT. 

 

 

Supraventricular Tachycardia (SVT) ablat

After all catheters are being removed and the vascular access closed with a compression bandage  and we will perform an ECG to determine normal rhythm.  

 

SVT ablation typically takes one to two hours to perform. 

Why would you need Radiofrequency Ablation Therapy?

The most common SVT (supraventricular tachycardia) indication is atrial flutter, a regular, fast heartbeat, causing insufficient heart function which often becomes symptomatic and other forms  like WPW (Wolff-Parkinson-White), AVNRT (Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia), AVRT (Atrioventricular reentry tachycardia).

 

Risks involved

Our ability to use imaging guidance and cutting-edge technology minimizes patient risk.  Prior to your procedure, you will discuss your individual potential risks with your doctor.

 

Conditions to let us know about

As with all procedures involving X-rays and contrast media, let your doctor know if you are currently pregnant or breast feeding and inform your doctor about possible allergies. 

 

Preparing for your procedure

You must be fasting at least 6 hours prior to the procedure.

 

Please discuss with your doctor what medications you are taking on a regular basis. Some, like blood thinning medications and diabetes medications, may need to be paused some days prior. 

 

Insurance coverage

Radiofrequency ablation therapy for supraventricular tachycardias like atrial flutter is covered by most private insurance providers. We will seek authorization from your insurance company prior to your procedure.

 

Recovering from your procedure

You will not receive general anesthesia during your procedure; however, sometimes light sedation may be necessary to make you feel more comfortable. You will be transferred to the regular room until you are ready for discharge usually on the next morning. You will be given written post procedure discharge instructions that will advise you about return to normal physical activity. 

 

 

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