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OTHER TREATMENTS

Treatment

Uterus Myoma (Fibroid) Embolization

This safe, simple procedure reduces the bleeding, pain and other symptoms of uterine myomas (fibroids) in 90% of women who have the treatment.

What is a Uterine Fibroid Embolization (UFE)?

With UFE, a catheter is guided through the femoral artery to the uterus after achieving arterial access through a needle puncture in the groin. Using x-ray guidance and contrast material, the specific arteries that feed the uterine fibroid are identified. Those arteries are injected with small particles. The particles wedge into the uterine vessels, blocking the flow of blood to the fibroid.   

 

Without a blood supply, the fibroid tissue dies and shrinks. All fibroids in the uterus can be treated in the same session. This procedure is performed under minimal sedation and analgesia (pain control).  

 

Indeed, the embolized myomas may cause pain which may need pain medication for a few days  

Why would you need a Uterine Fibroid Embolization?

Uterine fibroid embolization is used as an alternative to surgery to treat uterine fibroids and minimize their symptoms.

 

Women may choose fibroid embolization over surgery for one or more of the following reasons:

 

  • Significantly shorter recovery period

  • Lower complication rate

  • No scarring externally or internally

  • Potentially preserve fertility

  • Cannot or do not want to receive a blood transfusion, which may be necessary during surgery

  • Cannot receive general anesthesia

 

Risks involved

Our ability to use imaging guidance and cutting-edge technology minimizes patient risk. Prior to your procedure, your physician will discuss any potential risks with you.

 

Conditions to let us know about

Let your doctor know if you currently are pregnant or breast feeding, feeling ill, have a fever, or are taking any blood thinners.

 

Insurance coverage

Uterine Fibroid Embolization is covered by most private insurance providers. We will seek authorization from your insurance company prior to your procedure.

 

Preparing for your procedure

Thorough gynecological examination will be necessary prior to the procedure. 

If you are on blood thinners your doctor will instruct you if you need to stop these medications prior to the procedure. 

 

Recovering from your procedure

You will receive moderate sedation during your procedure and sufficient pain control. You will stay in the recovery area until you are ready for discharge. We prefer to keep our patients for overnight observation and sufficient pain control. 

 

When ready for discharge you will be given written post procedure discharge instructions that will advise you about return to normal physical activity.

 

 

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Treatment

Renal Artery Denervation

A simple procedure might cure high blood pressure.

What is Renal Denervation Therapy and how does it work?

The interventional radiologist will insert a catheter into the femoral artery in your thigh, and through this will access the arteries feeding your kidneys. During the  procedure, radiofrequency pulses are applied, burning the nerves in the walls of the renal arteries.   

 

The aim of the procedure is to burn the renal nerves without damaging the arteries. Each application of radiofrequency ablation will last  minutes, though this depends on the device used.    

 

The interventional radiologist may use special  catheter (tube) connected to a radiofrequency generator for the application of the radiofrequency pulse thereby destroying nerve cells around the renal artery that responsible for blood pressure regulating feed-back signals.

 

By destroying them, new studies now show a blood pressure lowering effect. This is very useful in drug resistant artrial hypertension. 

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Why would you need renal denervation therapy?

This procedure is designed for patients who suffer from resistant hypertension, i.e. those who have already unsuccessfully tried a regimen of at least 3-4medications to treat hypertension at the same time.

Although long term negative side effects are not established yet, this procedure is simple and shows promising results so far. 

 

Risks involved

Our ability to use imaging guidance and cutting-edge technology minimizes patient risk.  Prior to your procedure, you will discuss your individual potential risks with your doctor.

 

Conditions to let us know about

As with all procedures involving X-rays and contrast media, let your doctor know if you are currently pregnant or breast feeding and inform your doctor about possible allergies. 

 

Preparing for your procedure

You must be fasting at least 6 hours prior to the procedure.

Please discuss with your doctor what medications you are taking on a regular basis. Some, like blood thinning medications and diabetes medications, may need to be paused some days prior. 

 

Insurance coverage

Renal denervation therapy is covered by most private insurance providers. We will seek authorization from your insurance company prior to your procedure.

 

Recovering from your procedure

You will not receive general anesthesia during your procedure; however, sometimes light sedation may be necessary to make you feel more comfortable. You will stay in the monitored observational area for at least 8 hours after the intervention, then you will be transferred to the regular room until you are ready for discharge. 

 

You will be given written post procedure discharge instructions that will advise you about return to normal physical activity. 

 

 

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Treatment

Chemoembolization of Tumors

Delivering chemotherapy directly to the liver tumor using a non-surgical, minimally invasive technique

What is Chemoembolization?

Chemoembolization, or TACE (trans arterial chemoembolization) is a minimally invasive, non-surgical procedure used to treat inoperable liver cancer.

 

This innovative procedure delivers chemotherapy directly to the liver tumor using a non-surgical, minimally invasive technique performed by an interventional radiologist.

 

With chemoembolization, a catheter is inserted through a tiny puncture in the groin and threaded through the arteries until it reaches the hepatic artery.   

 

The hepatic artery is one of two blood vessels that feed the liver and the one that usually supplies blood to the tumors. Once the catheter is properly placed in the hepatic artery, a chemotherapy drug and millions of tiny particles are released into the blood stream. The particles lodge into the smaller blood vessels that feed the tumor.   

 

Depending on the type of cancer and number of tumors, chemoembolization may be used alone or in conjunction with another treatment, such as surgery, radiation or chemotherapy. The liver processes and removes the chemotherapy drug over approximately a four-week period.

 

The particles remain in the liver without causing any complications.

X-ray image of TOCE or Chemoembolization

Why would you need a Chemoembolization?

 

Chemoembolization is used to treat primary liver cancer and metastases to the liver from tumors that originated elsewhere (for example, colon cancer to the liver) in patients who cannot have the tumors surgically removed. It may also be used to shrink tumors prior to surgery. Not everyone with inoperable liver cancer is a candidate for this procedure.

 

If you are a candidate, your oncologist may recommend this procedure for the following reasons:

 

  • Treatment is regional (only affects the liver)

  • Minimally invasive, no cuts, no wounds

  • Milder side effects

  • Very short recovery time

  • Can be repeated

 

Risks involved

Our ability to use imaging guidance (highly specialized software integrated in our equipment) and cutting-edge technology minimizes patient risk. Prior to your procedure, your physician will discuss your individual potential risks with you.

 

Conditions to let us know about

Let your doctor know if you currently are pregnant or breast feeding, feeling ill, have a fever, or are taking any blood thinners.

 

Insurance coverage

Chemoembolization is covered by most private insurance providers. We will seek authorization from your insurance company prior to your procedure.

 

Preparing for your procedure

If you are on blood thinners your doctor will instruct you if you need to stop these medications prior to the procedure. 

 

Recovering from your procedure

You will receive sedation during your procedure. You will spend the night in the hospital monitoring for any signs of bleeding from the puncture site. 

 

When ready for discharge, you will be given written post procedure discharge instructions that will advise you about return to normal physical activity. 

 

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